Given that around 2.35 billion people will be using social media after 2020, it no longer makes any sense for businesses to ignore the importance of social media. No matter what part of the social media journey you're on, just starting out or a veteran – there's always room for improvement. With that in mind, here's ten ways to ramp up your social media presence.

Nine tips for localising your digital marketing and content marketing efforts

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In a crowded online landscape, some SME and mid-sized organisations get lost in Google rankings.   No longer can organisations sit by idly on the internet and wait to be noticed like a coy teenager at the school dance. When it comes to targeting localised target audiences using content and digital strategy, there are nine key strategic maneuvers to make in order to outdo the competition.

1. Create a geo-location strategy

Nine tips for localising your digital marketing and content marketing efforts
1. Create a geo-location strategy

According to eConsultancy, in the second quarter of 2019, consumers downloaded more than 30.3 billion mobile apps globally. This generated 22.5bn for Google Play and a 10% increase year on year profit. Although consumers spend up to 80% more on apps for iOS compared to Android.

Make a plan that includes relevant and popular search queries and keywords and that’s mobile-first, optimised for mobile ecommerce and localised. When analysing keywords, it’s important to make sure that they are relevant to your organisation and its services or products.

Also, identify if there are long tail keywords that include the particular region or state that you live in, and not just the city.

2. Talk about your area in the blog

It’s not just about using SEO tactics. Humans have to read your blog too. So use SEO best practices for geo-location and make reference to local areas in the posts.

To capture a local audience – speak their language. This can include references to local events, local celebrities or local issues of the day (only if this is relevant to the topic). You could even take it to the next level and use colloquial terms that will resonate with this local audience, and signal that you’re from this particular area, in a genuine way.

3. Have an active presence in the real world

Nine tips for localising your digital marketing and content marketing efforts
3. Have an active presence in the real world

We’re not talking about the online community, we mean the real world. Businesses should be concerned about the local community. The smartest PR move that businesses can make, is to tie their products or services to the activities of a local community charity, in a tangible and meaningful way.

For example yoga schools could offer a local mental health association a discount, for those affected by mental illness to join yoga classes. If you run an auto repair shop, then invest in supporting a local ‘drive safe’ campaign for teenagers.

This has many positive benefits, including increasing online and offline brand awareness, business contacts, and creating a positive impression of the brand in the local community.

4. Showcase local events on your site

Another easy way to get some local traffic to your site, is to showcase local events in your blog. This is a clever way to tie in products or services that businesses offer, with the activities of the local community. It can drive a lot of traffic to the site. Keep posts informative, entertaining and light-hearted and don’t go for the hard-sell.

Find out about opportunities to partner with or sponsor local events. This means a higher number of quality inbound links coming to the site. This will drive up the search ranking in a sustained and long term way.

5. Localise and personalise your website content

Nine tips for localising your digital marketing and content marketing efforts
5. Localise content with seasonal offers

New research by Monetate has revealed that personalisation strategies are helping companies exceed revenue expectations and get 3 x the ROI and customer lifetime value compared to companies not employing content personalisation.  

In much the same way, it’s possible to localise and personalise your website content by using CRM integrations. It’s possible to localise and customise your content so that it’s relevant to the particular season, location and even the weather. Although talking about this further is beyond the scope of this article, you may want to go to the Hubspot website to read their white papers on personalisation.

6. Localise your SEO keywords

Nine tips for localising your digital marketing and content marketing efforts
6. Localise your SEO keywords

Google’s search algorithm has moved on in leaps and bounds in recent years. Steer clear of translating plays on words, turns of phrase or other expressions in English into other languages with your Adwords campaign. These puns often end up sounding awkward in other languages. Instead in order to connect with customers in localised areas overseas, enlist the help of a local copywriter who can convert the message in the right way.

7. Localise your PPC landing pages

Nine tips for localising your digital marketing and content marketing efforts
7. Localise your PPC landing pages

Just as it’s important to localise your Pay Per Click ads, it’s also important to localise your landing pages. This ensures a consistency of messaging from the PPC ad campaign through to your targeted landing pages. For this you will need a local copywriter to translate puns and turns of phrase into the local lingo.

8. Socialise Your Blog Content

This doesn’t mean take a print out of the post, sit in a pub with a pint and talk to a piece of paper! What it means is promoting the blog posts on social media channels to an extended network of stakeholders like customers, potential customers, staff, family, friends and other interested third parties. Only then will the content begin to work hard for you.

Here’s a TED talk by mother bear of the blogging revolution, Mena Trott, creator of Movable Type. She talks about how the essence of blogging is building a much more friendly and connected world. This applies in just the same way to businesses, as it does to people writing about their own personal lives online. Although remember not to conflate the two. Business blogs need to stay on message and on brand, whereas personal blogs are free range and able to roam wherever they want.

Remember that when it comes to blog posts, the recipe is one part SEO, one part excellent and engaging writing.

Bonus Tip: Target localised users on mobile

Nine tips for localising your digital marketing and content marketing efforts
Bonus Tip: Target localised users on mobile

In 2019, smartphone has overtaken desktop in terms of ecommerce sales. According to the latest Capgemini IMRG research. This means you should amp up your mobile location based personalisation. It’s also important to invest in a mobile-first website that drives sales conversions.

Is your content working hard and producing good enough results for your business? Find out with a free content audit!

Eight Ingredients for Creating Landing Pages That Work

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If you’ve recently invested in an online marketing strategy, that includes some combination of affiliate marketing, Facebook advertising, PPC, social media, and SEO –  then you should be expecting an onslaught of traffic to your landing page, right? Wrong!That idea works great in theory. However, in reality a landing page needs to be handled with kid gloves. Here are eight essential principles for building a landing page, as a part of a broader web marketing strategy.


1. A concise and clear call to action (CTA)

6 ways to stimulate social media engagement for the real estate industry
1. A concise and clear call to action (CTA)

This is the end goal – the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. Therefore it needs to work hard for you. It’s more than simply words, ‘Sign Up Now’, ‘Start a Free Trail’ or ‘Shop Now’.

There should be no distractions and extraneous data that obfuscates the main goal. The best landing pages are simple, and accentuate one goal, and one goal only.

Consider what should remain above the fold. This means the information that appears on the site before scrolling is required. This part of the web page should have everything in a nutshell.


2. An offer or promise

2. An offer or promise

Visitors to your landing page will be thinking, what’s in it for me? There’s no other way with web marketing. Also, that’s just the psychology of human beings. This is why it’s important to have an offer or discount in place, in exchange for getting what you want from website visitors and getting their personal information.

Effective landing pages, with incredibly high conversion rates, move the customer deep into the conversion funnel. These sites gather information from visitors, in exchange for an offer or discount. After a time, the visitors can unsubscribe without a fee. In every sense – this is a win-win.  You can foster a sense of urgency by making the trial offer for a limited time.


3. Keep it simple

This TED talk below is about the paradox of consumer choice. Research has shown than when consumers are given too many choices, they ultimately take longer to make decisions, and often are put off completely.  Therefore, the simpler you make your landing page, the more effective it will be.  Narrow down the focus, be brief and succinct, and reap the benefits.

The paradox of consumer choice

4. Give me one reason to stay here

5. A catchy and memorable headline

In the obscure and largely forgotten 90’s song by Tracey Chapman, he asks us to ”Give me one reason to stay here…you gotta make me change my mind”. This is precisely what we must provide visitors to a landing page. Think of benefits, features, and how the product or service fulfils a need or solves a problem for customers.


5. A catchy and memorable headline

Visitors to your landing page got there for a reason. It’s the job of the headline to get them to pull up a chair and stay there a while. It takes a fraction of a second to decide whether or not to stay on a landing page.  See this example from Treehouse

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6. An Intuitive Layout for Multiple Devices

Eight Ingredients for Creating Landing Pages That Sell!
Consider how the website user will navigate through your website – UX or user experience

Bear in mind that the landing page that’s visible on your mammoth HD monitor, will be different from what other visitors see on older or smaller devices. Therefore, keep this in mind with the design. Keep the vital messages in the centre top of the screen, such as the headline, logo and call to action.


7. Appropriate and engaging visuals

Sometimes visuals can work well to express an abstract emotion

Don’t fall for crappy gifs, stock photos or poor quality videos. Visuals can be powerful when used correctly and sparingly. Sometimes visuals can be used to express an abstract emotion or theme of a blog, but only in a way that will make this obvious to the reader. Also you should avoid including videos that start automatically when the user opens the landing page – This is a cardinal sin. It’s intrusive and annoying, and guarantees that people will exit the landing page as soon as possible.


8. Badges of social authority

8. Badges of social authority
8. Badges of social authority

Always include social media links. If you have been established a while, then it’s also a good idea to include links to press clippings, testimonials, and a portfolio of work. This establishes credibility, authority and verifies that your business is a respectable player.  Don’t overdo it with self-aggrandizement though. Instead aim for simplicity and plenty of white space, with links to more information, should the visitors want to dig further.


Is your content working hard and producing good enough results for your business? Find out with a free content audit!

Getting on the blogging bandwagon: How to create interesting blog content

Getting on the blogging bandwagon: How to create interesting blog content

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Every business from start-up to multinational has a blog. You need to get on the blogging bandwagon, or feel its wheels rolling over the top of you! The challenge with blogging often isn’t the budget constraints, it’s coming up with engaging ideas that are going to resonate with your audience.

Everyone has a unique perspective and insights to share

The great thing about blogging is that everyone has many stories to share. Bring together a bunch of people with similar interests and challenges in life and you can build a supportive online community.

Create and Curate

No matter your blog topic – you can bet that somebody somewhere has already laid the groundwork, with an abundance of content written any topic under the sun. So take inspiration from this content, and then write your own story.

Curating lists is also a great idea. You could recommended blog posts, sites, books, podcasts or videos. This helps other people in the community and adds depth to your blog posts. People are more likely to stick around and read when the content is interesting, relevant and informative to them.

Guest Blogging

If you’ve enjoyed reading articles by certain bloggers then ask to interview them for our blog.  Most bloggers or subject matter experts will relish the opportunity for exposure. Firstly, make some editorial guidelines clear.

Don’t allow them to directly promote a specific product or service. Also, in many cases, you can avoid having to pay for a guest post, unless the blogger is enormously famous. Their pay-off comes at the end of the guest post, with an included brief about themselves, their expertise and a link to their own website.

A guest blogger’s writing can be like a breath of fresh air to a business blog. The guest blogger automatically becomes a powerful brand advocate, sharing the post all over social media. It’s a powerful way to immediately increase the reach and virality of the post.

Repurpose Your Existing Content

Use your existing collection of content to create a video tutorial, slideshare presentation, infographic, magazine article or any other type of new content. Most of the work will have already been done, it’s just a matter of tweaking the content for the new format.

Industry round-ups

Collect all of the interesting and industry-relevant research, quotes, and insights you can find from other popular blogs and websites. Then combine this with your own content that’s created in-house as well as industry research nuggets. When combined together this can be turned into long-form content for your blog.  and other little golden nuggets of information that you find elsewhere on the web. Posting this in a steady, uninterrupted flow onto social media is going to keep up the momentum of interest.

Think Telephone Not Loudspeaker

Make sure that your social media communication is like a telephone and not a loudspeaker or PA system. Social media is about engagement and getting people involved and interested in your story. People want to see you as a friend on social media, not a brand or business. So keep the content entertaining, light-hearted and amusing – as you would to your friends.  And don’t sell to your followers and fans, they will abandon you quicker than you can say ‘Sign Up Now’.

Quality content is the door, ingenuity and creativity is the key.  Speak with me today about how I can bring your blog to life!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Four ways to turn your social media and email marketing into a well-oiled machine

Four lessons in turning your social media and email marketing into a well-oiled machine

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Social media marketing and email marketing may seem a little redundant in the brave new world of AI and emerging technologies. However, they are still a powerful part of any marketing arsenal.  Think of social media and email marketing as the Neil and Tim Finn of the online marketing world. They just play really well together! 

Social media and email marketing are the Neil and Tim Finn of the online marketing world

Here are some key ways to seamlessly integrate your social media and email marketing efforts, then watch as new customers come within your reach.

Lesson 1. Email marketing Is not the daggy jumper you should throw away

Email marketing has somehow earned the reputation in online marketing circles as being akin to a  hand-knitted jumper with a dog motif.  But ask yourself, how many times have you checked email today or this week? According to email marketing research by UK based think tank Econsultancy, in 2017, 74% of client-side marketers rated email marketing as being either excellent or good for return on investment. 

Lesson 1. Email Marketing Is Not the Daggy Jumper You Should Throw Away
Lesson 1. Email Marketing Is Not the Daggy Jumper You Should Throw Away

That’s a pretty good reason to continue with email marketing. Although the landscape has shifted quickly in recent years, with AI and personalisation becoming the driving force behind email marketing campaigns.

Lesson 2: Create clickable content but not Click Bait

Lesson 2: Create clickable content but not Click Bait
Lesson 2: Create clickable content but not Click Bait

If you create a compelling and informative email newsletter, that tells people something that they didn’t already know – they may be compelled to share it. 

Always Connect

Any integrated social media and email marketing campaign should be united by genuine attempts at connecting with your audience. This doesn’t necessarily need to be a monetary incentive or discount offer. The invitation to connect could be far more personal and authentic than that. It could include:

Interesting, relevant content

Interesting and constantly refreshed content that is made to be compelling, informative and enjoyable to your audience and touches on what matters to them.

Training, support and the opportunity to build genuine connections

While monetary and discount rewards are relevant for generating quick sales. This doesn’t engender long-term customer loyalty. Instead, loyalty is built by having genuine and personalised conversations with your audience. This could be through offering support, training or knowledge-based rewards to your audience that build trust. Email and social media are perfect distribution channels for this.

Lesson 3: Optimise and test your email marketing

 Lesson 3: Optimise and test your email marketing
Lesson 3: Optimise and test your email marketing

Any primate with an opposable thumb can slap an opt-in button onto an email. However, a true email marketing artisan will test as well. It’s always a good idea to run some A/B testing on your eDM and your website for various opt-ins. Test various colour combinations and combinations of text and positioning on the page to find the most effective formula. Optimise and test your eDM itself to see what resonates best with your audience. Where it’s possible, you should personalise your email marketing through CRM personalisation tools (like those available in HubSpot and MailChimp).

Lesson 4: Offer loyalty incentives

 Lesson 4: Offer loyalty incentives
Lesson 4: Offer loyalty incentives

According to the Data and Marketing Association’s latest report, many brands are missing out on the benefits of customer loyalty initiatives. Only 49% of marketers in the survey said their company offered such a scheme.

Interestingly, it wasn’t only monetary incentives that interested the consumers in the study. Consumers also wanted rewards based on location, personalised emails, and game-like challenges.

Leverage these four lessons for integrating both social media and email marketing, and you will have mastered a valuable skill for cross-promoting your products or services. Good Luck!

Do you want to integrate your social media and email marketing into one well-oiled machine? Get in touch with me below.

The Strategic Content Marketing Stack 2019

The Strategic Content Marketing Stack 2019

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I recently put together a stackable model for strategic content marketing for clients which places a heavy focus on content marketing. This allows clients to see at a glance how all of the strategic planning and execution phases of a marketing strategy work together and inform the later stages. It’s difficult when putting together proposals for clients for them to visualise how all of the pieces fit together. This content marketing stack attempts to do this.

I recently put together a stackable model for strategic content marketing for clients which places a heavy focus on content marketing.

There is an intensive focus on content marketing for good reason, because content – whether it’s paid, earned or owned is the foundation of all marketing activity.

Think of your website as a hotel you own

If we think of the marketing stack as a hotel building, the design, development, UX and maintenance of websites and apps are the concrete pillars, outer walls and structural integrity of the building. The chaos outside of the building is kept at bay by the sound management and security of our hotel.

Think of your website as a hotel you own
Think of your website as a hotel you own

The navigability through the building and way-finding through the building and attention to detail is the UX, IA and interface design. This ensures our guests find their way through the building, towards the various amenities and service offerings.

The website content is the reception desk, tourist information, customer service, sales team, marketing team, HR and general manager. It’s the heart and soul of a business – the human side. Content is the memorable experiential side which makes one business stand out from another. After all, you can have the nicest hotel in the world, but if the staff are rude or incompetent, you won’t have buckley’s chance of getting repeat guests. It’s the same with content. When it’s not performing as it should, or when the meaning and intention of your content is not clear – your users will go elsewhere.

Content is the foundational marketing principle from which everything else in a website flows…

I hope I haven’t taken this metaphor too far, and I hope you get my drift. Content is the foundational marketing principle that helps a business to grow from original concept to start-up to multi-national brand.

Register now for a free content audit of your website